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Bhutan Map

Paro

Paro Taktsang Tigers Nest

Taktsang Tiger’s Nest Monastery

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paro is the gateway to the last Shangri-La on earth if you come by air because it houses the only international airport in Bhutan.  Located in the north-western part of Bhutan at an altitude of 2,250 m above the sea level, it is one of the districts with a huge dzongkha speaking community…

Haa

Chele La Pass

Chele La Pass

 

Haa is characterized by a narrow north-south valley and is often known as “the Hidden-land rice valley”. Covering an area of 1,900 sq.km with altitude ranging from 800m to 5,600m, the dzongkhag has six gewogs (counties)…

 

Thimphu

Thimphu Memorial Chorten

Memorial Chorten, Thimphu

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thimphu the capital city of the tiny kingdom of Bhutan is two hour’s drive, 65 kilometers, from Paro.  It is the one among two capital cities in Asia without traffic lights. The other is Pyongyang in North Korea.  The main traffic is controlled by a smartly dressed traffic police man wearing white gloves…

Punakha

Punakha Dzong Fortress

Punakha Dzong

 

 

 

 

 

 

Punakha district is a significant place in Bhutanese history and it is still given the importance it deserves. One of the most beautiful valleys in Bhutan it attracts a lot of tourist. The town which is 77 kilometers away from Thimphu, takes about three hours to reach…

Wangdue Phodrang

Wangdue Phodrang Dzong

Wangdue Phodrang Dzong

Towards the south of Punakha is Wangduephodrang also commonly known as Wangdue, the last western town on the highway before entering central Bhutan. It is a bustling town with pretty view of the valley and the dzong. The second largest district in Bhutan…

 

Bumthang

Kurjey Monastery

Kurjey Monastery

Bumthang is so called because the valley is shaped like a “bumpa” or the vessel containing holy water placed on altars (“bum”) and “thang” implies “field” or “flat place”. The other translation relates to a beautiful girl (“bum”)…

 

 

Trongsa

Trongsa Dzong (Fortress)

Trongsa Dzong (Fortress)

It’s a sleepy but pleasant town, seven hours’ drive from the Capital. You can get a fine view of the Black Mountain Range towards the southwest. A major part of the town’s population comprise of Bhutanese of Tibetan descent. Tibetans immigrated to this part of the country in the late 1950s and early 1960s.

Zhemgang

Golden Langur

Golden Langur

Zhemgang was once called Kheng along with fragments of neighbouring town Mongar. The territory was absorbed into Bhutan in the 17th century. Panbang, south of Zhemgang is known for its bamboo works.

Mongar

Mongar Dzong Fortress in Bhutan

Mongar Dzong (Fortress)

Mongar is known for lemon grass that produces essential oil and the hydropower project on Kurichhu. In fact, though Mongar has little to offer to tourists, it is the fastest growing district in the east.

Trashigang

Trashigang Dzong

Trashigang Dzong

Not many tourists make it to Trashigang as it requires a lot of driving around but it is the focal point of eastern Bhutan and used to be a centre of trade with Tibet. At present, the main town is a small parking space surrounded by shops and crammed with cars in the centre of which stands a huge prayer wheel.

Trashi Yangtse

Chorten Kora

Chorten Kora

Earlier it used to be part of Trashigang (a dungkhag/ sub-district) but Trashiyangtse became a full-fledged dzongkhag in 1993. On the north, it shares its border with the Indian state of Arunachal Pradesh and cross-border trade still exists. The new settlement lies three km from the old dzong, near Chorten Kora.

Chhukha

Kharbandi Monastery

Kharbandi Monastery

The most distinctive feature of Chhukha is the Chhukha and Tala Hydropower projects. The two projects tap the fast-running waters of the Wangchhu and Paachhu Rivers to produce more than 1,500 Megawatts of power.

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